METCO Directors' Association

Creating educational opportunities since 1975 

DEC. 2, 2016 : dr. cornel wesT

THIS YEAR'S 2016 MDA CONFERENCE KEYNOTE

​Preparing Students of Color to be Successful in a Global Society

TICKETS

Superintendent Strand $225

Educators/Support Services Strand $200

Educators/Support Services Strand w/PDP's $225

The MDA Conference will be held at

the Four Points Sheraton in Norwood, MA. 

Registration is first-come/first served.

Registration CLOSED

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS:


Superintendent Strand

(Superintendents and Assistant Superintendents only)

Dr. Cornel West 

Morning Session

Dr. Cornel West will discuss the importance of K-12 education as it relates to topics such as income inequality, mass incarceration, and the overall success of students of color.  Dr. West will underscore the role Educational Leadership has in ensuring access to higher education, and professional opportunities that ultimately prepare students to be successful globally.

Dr. Paul Ash

Afternoon Session
The Lexington Public Schools substantially eliminated achievement gaps for high school African American students, most of whom are METCO students. In this workshop, you will learn from Dr. Paul Ash, Lexington’s former Superintendent of Schools, how Lexington significantly narrowed achievement gaps, and hear about successful gap closing strategies from other school systems throughout the world.

In this workshop, Dr. Ash will share with you the six essential characteristics of all gap-closing schools, and the story of his school system’s journey.

• Creating urgency and guiding coalitions - What is the role of leadership?

• Focusing on high-leverage gap-closing strategies

• Developing a plan of action -What do we do first, next?

• Supporting educators and students throughout the change process

• Monitoring student progress

• Focusing on results in a growth-oriented school system

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Educators Strand

1. Solid, Secure and Ready to Soar:

    Transforming Identity to “Identifree”
    Deidre R. Farmbry, Ed.D.

Great leaders recognize the importance of culture in achieving academic results with students of color.  The climate and culture of a school is greatly impacted by the beliefs, attitudes and relationships that are formed by all stakeholders. Cultivating an inclusive culture helps students to build self-esteem and character, empowers students see their own strength in learning and encourage students to realize their dreams. This session aims to provide school leaders and teachers with tools and strategies that will help build a culture of hope, build meaningful relationship with students of color, and establish positive relationship with families and community of students coming from diverse backgrounds. According to Gruenert & Whitaker (2015), the effectiveness of a new culture depends on the strength of the people behind the change and the strength of the pre-existing culture.

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2. Building Brown Boys for Global Success
    Craig Martin, M.Ed.

Do you have a Blueprint of Success to guide your journey as a Black or Brown Male? Participants will examine the developmental assets necessary for success, the impetus of identifying appropriate role models and advocates to fortify male identity, and what C.O.R.E. supporters and tools our male youth (ages 4 and up) will need to thrive in American classrooms. Additionally, participants will develop their own Brown Boy Blueprints that provides real- world practices that will truly empower African American and Latino American males to achieve success inside and outside the classroom.

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3.Constructive White Conversations
    
Dan ZanesMike Feldstein

Often when White people go to a workshop about race and racism, the workshop begins with a set of assumptions and guidelines. We have been working on a different way to engage White people in discussions about race and anti-racism so that they can be more effective preparing students of color for success. Through our most recent work, we have observed that when White people have meaningful, personal discussions about how racism has diminished them and how being anti-racist has transformed their personal and professional lives, White people become more engaged in this work, are more eager to take action to dismantle racism and more effective when working with students of color. In the workshop, participants will learn about Constructive White Conversations, a group founded in 2013 that engages White people in conversations about race. In addition, participants will engage in activities that can be used in the classroom (any level) that lead to meaningful discussions about race, identity and privilege.
As a result of these discussions and activities, White educators will continue to develop positive White racial identities, which will lead to greater success with students of color.

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4. Understanding the Connections Microagressions, Identity Formation and      Disruptive Behavior
  Kalise D. Wornum, M.Ed.


As educators, we must understand the impact racial microaggressions have on girls of color as they struggle to form their intellectual identity. All too often their reactions to racial microaggressions require disciplinary interventions. Teachers must understand the connection between a students’ struggle for identity affirmations and disruptive and disrespectful behavior. Using the work of Monique Morris, (author Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools) of and Dr. Derald Sue, (author of Microaggressions in Everyday Life) this interactive workshop will provide the participants with a clear definition of racial microaggressions, that are commonplace in suburban public schools.  The attendees will also gain practical skills to interrupt this dangerous reality and discuss ways to counter the negative effect of racial microaggessions and thereby create an atmosphere that allows for the birth of intellectual identity.

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5. Developing the Cultural Competence of Educators:

    Better Preparing Schools to Teach Students of Color in a Global Society 
    Christina Brown, Partner TNTP

Schools and districts have a moral and educational imperative to support educators in developing their cultural competence, self-awareness, and reflective capacity to explore and eradicate bias and stereotype threat if they are to prepare students of color successfully.   Engaging educators in becoming culturally competent and self-aware is the first step in creating schools the effectively prepare students of color for a global society.  This workshop provides resources for teachers and administrators in scaffolding reflective practice through the use of protocols and norms to engage in these conversations safely, with structure and thoughtfulness.  This workshop will engage participants in a discussion about the importance of explicitly naming cultural competence as a goal for all educators.  Participants will engage with resource and protocols that can be used in their schools and districts to start courageous conversations around race that develop the skills and capacities educators need to serve all students.

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6.What It Takes To Close Achievement Gaps, Morning Session

    (Administrators Only)
   
Paul B. Ash, Ph.D.

The Lexington Public Schools substantially eliminated achievement gaps for high school African American students, most of whom are METCO students. In this workshop, you will learn from Dr. Paul Ash, Lexington’s former Superintendent of Schools, how Lexington significantly narrowed achievement gaps, and hear about successful gap closing strategies from other school systems throughout the world.

In this workshop, Dr. Ash will share with you the six essential characteristics of all gap-closing schools, and the story of his school system’s journey.

• Creating urgency and guiding coalitions - What is the role of leadership?

• Focusing on high-leverage gap-closing strategies

• Developing a plan of action -What do we do first, next?

• Supporting educators and students throughout the change process

• Monitoring student progress


• Focusing on results in a growth-oriented school system

______________________________________________________________________


7.Developing a World Prospective Through Everyday Experiences with Police,     Race, and Schools; How these Experiences Impact Global Success
    Panel of Police and School Professionals, along with Students and Community         Leaders


The future well-being and prosperity of our communities depends on our children and youth. We all want our own children and indeed all children to have a happy and fulfilling childhood and to become successful adults. And, society as a whole benefits when each child reaches his or her full potential and is not limited in his or her opportunity to contribute to the well-being of the community.  Research shows that one of the most significant and potentially long-lasting impacts of racial profiling is its effect on children and youth. Racial profiling in several contexts, in particular in the education system and in law enforcement, is compromising the future of our children and youth and, in turn, the future prosperity of us all.  The school setting is one of the first places that children learn to relate to and interact with one another and with persons in positions of authority. It is often in relation to their teachers that children begin to develop a perception of themselves and of the world around them. As such, a student’s experience in school can have a major effect on his or her self-image and self-esteem and on his or her development in later life.  In this workshop the panelist will discuss implicit bias and profiling and the impact this has on global success.

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Support Services Strand

8. Removing Barriers:

21st Century Behavior Management Interventions for Professionals Working with Children and Youth of Color
Cynthia Freeman Smalls, Ed.D, LPC, NCC, CPCS

Schools across the county are struggling to maintain a safe orderly secure learning environment and address behaviors of students who are “celebrity obsessed” and media saturated. The role of the support services professional in schools are paramount and vital in providing interventions to assist students of color in removing barriers that prevent learning.This workshop will provide a brief overview of strategies and means for addressing and redirecting negative behaviors of children and youth of color.  This training is intended to aid support service professionals in developing a system of prevention, and strategies to combating adverse behaviors. 
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9. Educating the Traumatized Child 

Cognitive and Behavioral Considerations and Interventions in the School Setting
Karin Eato-Wall, LICSW

Children growing up in American culture are impacted directly or indirectly by the threat of traumatizing violence. They are confronted with war, threats of terrorism and the effects of racism, poverty and lack of education.  On a micro level school age children in most urban areas are confronted  with the threat of direct violence or at least have an awareness of gun and gang related violence, weapons in schools as well as sex trafficking.  While we may not be able to change the culture of violence we can and should teach our youth how to navigate in the world and prepare them for successful futures.  This workshop will examine the science behind trauma, the impact of direct long term trauma on the brains of youth and discuss the very real public health crisis awaiting us if attention is not paid to this population of young people.
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10. Intersectionality:

Towards Increased Self-Awareness and Cultural Humility
Wendy Champagnie Williams, PhD, MSW, LICSW

Awareness to one’s social location – place in society – with particular attention to dynamics of power and privilege, is a critical component of professional practice that is competent and reflects cultural humility.  The lens of intersectionality gives primacy to the interaction between key areas of oppression: race, class, and gender, while still acknowledging other locations where systems of power converge (Murphy, Hunt, Zajicek, Norris, & Hamilton, 2009).  The educational setting is one where multiple aspects of human diversity exist and are impacted by dynamics of power.  It is of vital importance that, clinical practitioners (e.g. social workers, psychologists), educators and administrators be aware of their own social identities and the ways in which these identities may enhance or hinder efforts to engage, empower, and support the increasingly diverse students, families, and communities with whom they interact on a daily basis.

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